The Spy in Moscow Station

๐—•๐—ข๐—ข๐—ž ๐—ฅ๐—˜๐—ฉ๐—œ๐—˜๐—ช

In the late 1970s, the National Security Agency still did not officially existโ€•those in the know referred to it dryly as the No Such Agency. So why, when NSA engineer Charles Gandy filed for a visa to visit Moscow, did the Russian Foreign Ministry assert with confidence that he was a spy?
Outsmarting honey traps and encroaching deep enough into enemy territory to perform complicated technical investigations, Gandy accomplished his mission in Russia, but discovered more than State and CIA wanted him to know.
Eric Haseltine’s The Spy in Moscow Station tells of a time whenโ€•much like todayโ€•Russian spycraft had proven itself far beyond the best technology the U.S. had to offer. The perils of American arrogance mixed with bureaucratic infighting left the country unspeakably vulnerable to ultra-sophisticated Russian electronic surveillance and espionage.

๐˜๐˜ฎ๐˜ฎ๐˜ฆ๐˜ณ๐˜ด๐˜ช๐˜ท๐˜ฆ, ๐˜ณ๐˜ช๐˜ท๐˜ฆ๐˜ต๐˜ช๐˜ฏ๐˜จ ๐˜ข๐˜ฏ๐˜ฅ ๐˜ต๐˜ฉ๐˜ณ๐˜ช๐˜ญ๐˜ญ๐˜ช๐˜ฏ๐˜จ!
Wow, what an interesting book, and just hard to beleive that itโ€™s a true story about the world of spying, it was just fascinating.
There were some parts a bit technical but overall a itโ€™s a very well researched story that I really enjoyed.

Thank you St. Martin’s Press for this copy.

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